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Maxillary Sinuses Symptoms
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[size=4][b]Chronic Sinusitis Meningitis - Recurring Sinus Infection - an Explanation?[/b][/size][hr]
Quote:As part of our efforts to chronicle the experiences of sinusitis sufferers, a gentleman named Carlton contributed a 'Sinusitis Treatment Success' story.

[size=large][b]This is Leading Edge Stuff[/b][/size][hr]Mayo received a patent on anti-fungal treatments. I decided to try this approach after everything else failed. I don't want surgery, because I've never heard of one that worked. It is only because that we are rather fluent on the subject of Sinus Treatment that we have ventured on writing something so influential on Sinus Treatment like this!

[size=large][b]Had 2 Different Allergy Tests, Both Negative[/b][/size][hr]The Mayo/U. of Buffalo research says this is not an allergic reaction like a pollen allergy, so it wouldn't show up in an allergy test. It's an over reaction to fungus by T-cells that damage the sinus lining and gives bacteria a place to grow. Most people have no reaction, but most people with chronic sinusitis do. Apparently there is a test, but ENT's are skeptical. Mine said the fungus idea was false and suggested surgery. If I was cynical, I might think his opinion was because there's no surgical solution.

Another article in the Health Solutions Newsletter of Sept 2005 also referred to the Mayo Clinic/U. of Buffalo study and adds further clarification. Their article was entitled 'Mayo Clinic Announces Startling New Sinus Discovery' It is only through sheer determination that we were able to complete this composition on Sinusitis. Determination, and regular time table for writing helps in writing essays, reports and articles. :o.

Hopefully the follow-on work of the Mayo Clinic and University of Buffalo will identify antifungal treatments that can finally go after the root cause of recurring sinus infection. Sinus sufferers should be aware of these research efforts and be ready to discuss these findings with their ENT specialists. Maybe serious help is finally on the way.

Start using pulsating nasal irrigation to cleanse the nose of crusty old mucus which could be carrying toxins. 2. Test your environment to see if you are exposed to high levels of fungus. Although there was a lot of fluctuation in the writing styles of we independent writers, we have come up with an end product on Sinus Infection worth reading!

[size=large][b]Asked Carlton in a Follow-Up Email If He Had Tested Positive for Fungi in Previous[/b][/size][hr]Allergy tests, and here is his response: 'Hello Walt: When a child shows a flicker of understanding when talking about Sinus Symptoms, we feel that the objective of the meaning of Sinus Symptoms being spread, being achieved.

[size=large][b]I'll Let You Know How It Goes, but So Far, I Feel Much Better[/b][/size][hr]Carlton' Huge Implications in the Study Results There are huge implications in this study for those who suffer from recurring sinus infection. This work could lead to treatments that treat the root cause of the problem for the first time.


[size=medium][b]The Asthma Center Education and Research Fund | Newsletter | Sinusitis[/b][/size]
[Image: https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/979/i...n-A27.jpeg]

He pointed out a study conducted by the Mayo clinic and the University of Buffalo addressing the issue of recurring sinus problems infection. It states that "chronic sinusitis is an immune disorder caused by fungus." :o.

'Jens Panikau, sinus researcher at Mayo Clinic, has published a new finding that explains why sinus disease persists despite so many new drugs. Dr Panikau found that the main cause of sinus symptoms was that the eosinophiles ' your special cells that defend your body against infection, - get into the mucus and produce a toxic product called MBP that is made in order to kill bacteria. Unfortunately, among sinus sufferers, there is an excess of this MBP in the mucus that also damages the cells of the nose and impairs its ability to sweep bacteria out of the nose. Dr Panikau shows that it is the MBP that makes the patient sick, with fever, pain, fatigue, and secondary infections.'

[list][*]If the tests are positive for fungus, try to improve your environment to lower the amount of fungus you are exposed to.[*]There are numerous books and articles which address this subject.[/list]

[size=large][b]Sinus Infections are One of the Most Common Infections Across the World[/b][/size][hr]Sinus attacks are caused by an infection in the sinuses or cavities that are present in the bones near the nose. When there is any swelling in these sinuses because of some infection, breathing becomes difficult resulting in fever, headaches, and other discomforts. This is known as sinusitis.
[size=medium][b]Medical Story: My Chronic Sinus Infection[/b][/size]


Quote:Hey everyone! (Or no one) So this is a video documenting my chronic sinus infection. I blabber a lot so I'm sorry for that. Its really the first video I've ever made.

There are many over-the-counter decongestions and pain killers available to provide relief from sinus infections. These can be in the form of tablets or sprays. There are also home major symptoms of sinus infection like a cold/hot compress, jalapeno pepper, ripe grape juice, etc. These can provide effective relief from sinus symptoms. But acute or chronic sinusitis requires continuous treatment from a specialist. We cannot be blamed if you find any other article resembling the matter we have written here about Sinus Infection. What we have done here is our copyright material!

Each sinus or cavity in the skull has an opening that allows free exchange of mucus and air. Each sinus is joined to the other by a mucous membrane lining. When there is an infection like hay fever or a disease like asthma, these sinuses and the lining become inflamed, causing air and mucus to be blocked inside or a vacuum to be created. This can cause pressure on the sinus walls, causing severe pain. There are four kinds of sinuses: frontal sinuses, maxillary sinuses, ethmoid sinuses, and sphenoid sinuses. Any part of these four sinuses can be infected, causing pain in that particular area. It was our decision to write so much on Sinus after finding out that there is still so much to learn on Sinus.

Other common symptoms for sinus infections are pain in the head, ear or neck; headaches early in the morning; pain in the upper jaw/ cheeks /teeth; swelling of the eyelids; pain between the eyes; nasal discharge; stuffy nose; loss of smell; and tenderness near the nose. Sometimes, there could be fever, tiredness, weakness, severe cough and runny nose. Sinusitis can be diagnosed by tapping the sinus areas with fingertips. Very rarely, acute sinusitis can lead to infection in the brain or some other complications.

There are different kinds of sinus infection symptoms depending upon the sinus that is infected. There can be pain anywhere near these sinuses. With frontal sinuses there can be pain over the eyes in the brow area; with maxillary sinuses, inside each cheekbone; with ethmoid sinuses, just behind the bridge of the nose and between the eyes; and with sphenoid sinuses, behind the ethmoids in the upper region of the nose and behind the eyes. This pain is the most common symptom for sinusitis.
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Maxillary Sinuses Symptoms - by aureliojones2 - 08-12-201602:38 PM
RE: Maxillary Sinuses Symptoms - by aureliojones2 - 08-12-201602:44 PM

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